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The Great Windows 8 CP Discussion!


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#21 FalseAgent

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 09:18 PM

I have only 1 feeling about Windows 8.

PURE HATRED.

that's not good for health, bro :lol:

#22 Villain

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 03:36 AM

Ok so I have "Denounced the Evils of Metro" over and over and, yeah, you get the idea.

However ... I have 8 installed dual-boot style. I have been in 8 for 2 days now, doing the occasional reboot, etc..

The only real issues i have so far...

  • Cant Reboot/shutdown when logged in
  • (obvious) lack of a Start Menu/Panel
  • Cant play Minecraft (OpenGL) as how mu Radeon HD 3200 does not have Win8 drivers... But thats ok.

and you know what? Thats it! Thats all of it, those three items.

I find myself using Metro a bit more every few hours. I dont care for the Videos or Pictures Metro apps, but hey, Apps in Development, i can understand it.

Also, i honestly, genuinly find myself going "damn, gotta reboot, i dont wanna go back to 7!"
My system seems to have very few issues (although that could be whats known as "Clean install so there is no junk apps"

So yeah I am Officially "liking it".

Also, i am officially modifying mStart, my Metro Start Panel, to work under Windows 8. I gotta have my menu!

#23 Tataarujin

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 08:55 AM


I have only 1 feeling about Windows 8.

PURE HATRED.

that's not good for health, bro :lol:

Not healthful is when somebody can cut your heart from your chest with bare hands. Hatred is just hyperbolized emotion.

#24 FalseAgent

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 01:27 PM

I find myself using Metro a bit more every few hours. I dont care for the Videos or Pictures Metro apps, but hey, Apps in Development, i can understand it.

yeah I was disappointed by the built-in metro apps as well. They're so bare (and buggy). But hey, they're still in development.

  • Cant Reboot/shutdown when logged in

Alot of people are complaining about this, but really, it's here:

Posted Image

I agree that it's a little buried down there.

#25 Frylock86

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 02:27 PM

So, I've been running the beta on a 3 year old 1.6GHz dual core AMD processor, and a 120 GB HDD, and it take 16 seconds to go from a cold boot to the lock screen. :woot:

#26 Rehab Uddin

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 02:34 PM

Is there a Notification center in Windows 8 ?
I do not see any place where I can get the list of notifications.


The Video, Music and Photo apps are great ! But I find them a slow when I need to play select and play videos, Its takes a lot of time.
and One I click a picture from my desktop it takes me to the Photo app. But When I press next arrow, it does not show next pix. Which I think should be added.

The XE currency converter is great :D. The gadget had limited countries. Now I dont have to go to XE website to convert

#27 FalseAgent

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 01:30 AM

Is there a Notification center in Windows 8 ?
I do not see any place where I can get the list of notifications.


The Video, Music and Photo apps are great ! But I find them a slow when I need to play select and play videos, Its takes a lot of time.
and One I click a picture from my desktop it takes me to the Photo app. But When I press next arrow, it does not show next pix. Which I think should be added.

The XE currency converter is great :D. The gadget had limited countries. Now I dont have to go to XE website to convert

There is no notification center, push notifications come and go (however, they will stay on the screen if you left your PC idle, similar behavior to system tray notifications on the desktop in Windows 7). There is no need for a notifications center at all because the Live Tiles on the start screen can show you what notifications that you have missed, so that isn't really a problem.

I totally agree about the photo app suggestion you made. Microsoft has a long way to go if they're serious about making these metro style apps as replacements to our traditional Win32 apps.

Edited by FalseAgent, 04 March 2012 - 01:34 AM.


#28 littleman91

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 04:27 AM

So I've tried windows 8 and I think this will be great for tablet users, but the design of the os feels sooo inappropriate for the main desktop users. It really feels like it's a tablet OS ported on a PC. The way you use it with the mouse just doesn't feel right compared to any other OS.

#29 FalseAgent

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 02:44 PM

So I've tried windows 8 and I think this will be great for tablet users, but the design of the os feels sooo inappropriate for the main desktop users. It really feels like it's a tablet OS ported on a PC. The way you use it with the mouse just doesn't feel right compared to any other OS.

For the Metro apps, yeah, we're all used to having the right click bring up a context menu, but now, right-click brings up the app bar. That doesn't feel right at first, but then, having all of our apps in

For the hot corners, however, if you've used a mac, they feel the same. Mission Control/ Expose uses hot corners in a similar fashion as well.

#30 The Flashing Fish

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 03:15 PM

I find Windows 8 to be cumbersome. Basic tasks that I could do in Windows 7 they've made it more difficult to do on a desktop/laptop.

Since I'm on my laptop, naturally I will be on the classic desktop as you cannot pay me enough to use IE10.

In order to access a list of my programs, I have to go down to the bottom left hand corner of the screen and click, switch to the start screen, right click, go down to "All Apps" and now I have a list of all of my programs.

In Windows 7, I click the OBVIOUS start button (remember "All Apps in Win 8 is hidden), and click "All Programs." Boom, there they are.

Control Panel is easier to find to. I needed to adjust my mouse sensitivity, I didn't know how to access control panel, but I knew I could just start typing to search. So I hit "M" "O" "U" "S" "E". NOTHING! Oh no, wait, let me check "Settings" under the search box. In Windows 7 it's "windows key" and "M" "O" "U" and enter. So much easier. And just having to switch between two totally different UIs just gets tiring and inconsistent.

I don't see how people can find this crap "fluid" and "easy." Someone tell me something I can do easier in Windows 8 that is difficult to do in Windows 7. Someone justify this crap.

#31 Frylock86

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 04:11 PM

In order to access a list of my programs, I have to go down to the bottom left hand corner of the screen and click, switch to the start screen, right click, go down to "All Apps" and now I have a list of all of my programs.

In Windows 7, I click the OBVIOUS start button (remember "All Apps in Win 8 is hidden), and click "All Programs." Boom, there they are!



You have some habits to break. Why are you torturing yourself by still trying to browse ALL your programs?

Windows Key > Type to search > Pin to Start. Hell, most programs are pinned to the Start Screen by default after installation.

Edited by Frylock86, 04 March 2012 - 04:12 PM.


#32 FalseAgent

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 04:14 PM

I find Windows 8 to be cumbersome. Basic tasks that I could do in Windows 7 they've made it more difficult to do on a desktop/laptop.

Since I'm on my laptop, naturally I will be on the classic desktop as you cannot pay me enough to use IE10.

In order to access a list of my programs, I have to go down to the bottom left hand corner of the screen and click, switch to the start screen, right click, go down to "All Apps" and now I have a list of all of my programs.

In Windows 7, I click the OBVIOUS start button (remember "All Apps in Win 8 is hidden), and click "All Programs." Boom, there they are.

Control Panel is easier to find to. I needed to adjust my mouse sensitivity, I didn't know how to access control panel, but I knew I could just start typing to search. So I hit "M" "O" "U" "S" "E". NOTHING! Oh no, wait, let me check "Settings" under the search box. In Windows 7 it's "windows key" and "M" "O" "U" and enter. So much easier. And just having to switch between two totally different UIs just gets tiring and inconsistent.

I don't see how people can find this crap "fluid" and "easy." Someone tell me something I can do easier in Windows 8 that is difficult to do in Windows 7. Someone justify this crap.

Why do you need to see a list of your programs? That is absolutely useless. What people really need is to type the name of the program, and it will trigger a search, and then bam, launch the program. If you use that program frequently, pin it to the start screen, there is plenty of space there. If the program supports a Live Tile, even better.

Something easier to do in Windows 8? Yeah, it only takes around 10 seconds (with BIOS and POST) to boot up and get started. I don't even have to open any programs to see what e-mail I have received. It isn't obvious now, but i'm pretty sure I can easily find an app that suits my needs in the Windows Store as more apps arrive. There are alot of other things as well, the list is potentially pretty long.

Edited by FalseAgent, 04 March 2012 - 04:24 PM.


#33 The Flashing Fish

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 05:15 PM

You have some habits to break. Why are you torturing yourself by still trying to browse ALL your programs?

Windows Key > Type to search > Pin to Start. Hell, most programs are pinned to the Start Screen by default after installation.


Why should I break some habits? Why can't they give me more than one way to skin a cat. Guess what I can do in Windows 7? "Windows Key> Type to search> Pin to Start." Guess what I can't do in Windows 8? Easily access all of my programs. So really, all they have done is provide me with the same functionality in Windows 7 while making the same task that's easy to do in Windows 7 more difficult to do in Windows 8. THIS IS PROGRESS???

I don't need all of my programs pinned to the start menu, or on the taskbar. I simply don't. I don't need ATI's Catalyst Control Center pinned, I don't need WinRAR pinned. But every so often, I will need to access these programs, and you're expecting me to remember the name of them? Sure, if I do remember the name, I use search on Windows 7. If I don't, I have to find it, and on Windows 8, it's more of a pain in the ass. So what's better?

On Windows 8, it sure is torture searching through all of my programs. I can't say the same for Windows 7. MS really screwed the pooch on that.


Why do you need to see a list of your programs? That is absolutely useless.


So I can open up a program I don't have pinned... Herp derp derp.

What people really need is to type the name of the program, and it will trigger a search, and then bam, launch the program.


And if I don't remember the name of the program? I guess what you're saying is that I'm then fucked, aren't you? I have to go through more hassle to find the program than I do in Windows 7.

And besides, I CAN ALREADY DO THIS ON WINDOWS 7!

If you use that program frequently, pin it to the start screen, there is plenty of space there.


I can pin programs to the start menu now, and I can pin programs to the taskbar too in Windows 7.

If the program supports a Live Tile, even better.


That's about the only benefit. More hassle for a simple insignificant benefit available to some programs.

Something easier to do in Windows 8? Yeah, it only takes around 10 seconds (with BIOS and POST) to boot up and get started.


How often are you having to restart your computer? Seriously. So they shaved 10 seconds off from waiting, when it's something you seldom have to do. The laptop I'm typing this on now hasn't been restarted in 2 weeks! 2 weeks! Know how long it takes to wake it up from standby? 2 seconds. And when I do have to restart it, it takes 5 more seconds over what Windows 8 might take. Is it a benefit? Yeah, sure. But is this enough to make me switch? Hell no.

I don't even have to open any programs to see what e-mail I have received.


I once had Live Mail setup to automatically open at start up. I had it pinned to the start menu and always open. When I received an e-mail, a little icon appeared alerting me to new e-mails. The program was already opened, so I just brought it up front. A tile that allows me to see that I have received an e-mail is hardly a new feature when I can get that feature in Windows 7 now.

It isn't obvious now, but i'm pretty sure I can easily find an app that suits my needs in the Windows Store as more apps arrive. There are alot of other things as well, the list is potentially pretty long.


And we need a new OS to implement an app store? Really? Apple was able to bring the app store to Mac OS X Snow Leopard for free.

It's funny you guys totally ignored my point about searching through control panel items more complicated than it is in Windows 7.

Windows 8 is such a huge step back for laptops and desktops, it's not even funny.

I love the new task manager and the copy function, but I can easily go without if it means I get to retain the ease of use Windows 7 currently provides me over Windows 8.

#34 FalseAgent

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 07:12 PM

-snip-

I guess you should just stick to Windows 7 - I mean, afterall, Windows 8's only real competitor is Windows 7. In fact, I think you could just use XP, since Windows XP still can do many of the things Windows 7 does, only just with a lesser prettier skin.

Anyway, I didn't discuss about your point about searching through control panel items being more complicated than Windows 7, because, well, pretty much everyone who hates Windows 8 and Metro say around the same thing.

So it's a couple of more clicks to do certain things. It isn't a big deal, really (to be fair, it takes lesser clicks to do other things, like accessing in-app settings). You say your laptop hasn't been restarted in 2 weeks. I'll use the same analogy here: I haven't adjusted my mouse sensitivity since....forever. Yup.

Everyone just goes on about how they can't do this and that, bla bla bla, and yes, it's all true. I'm a Windows 7 user, a Windows 7 fan, and I know that as well. We all do.

We can go on nitpicking every single thing. There's no point to this: OSX users could nitpick at what they can't do on Windows, and hell, even XP users still continue to nitpick on Windows 7 because they think Windows XP is king.

You said you had Live Mail open at start up, but you haven't restarted your laptop in 2 weeks. So you had kept Live Mail running for 2 weeks just to get notified for new e-mails? Awesome! I had Live Mail open at start up once as well, and I know that Windows 8's implementation of Mail, while incomplete in it's current form, is already leaps ahead of what I used to do in Windows 7. Once again, this is just another pointless case of nitpicking.

We must not confuse familiarity with ease of use. Just because Windows 7 and the taskbar+start menu is what we're familiar with, just because we know our way around it, doesn't mean that it's the best. We're just seasoned to it.

You want all of your programs? In the start screen > right click > all apps. Done. What's so difficult about that? As for searching for "M-O-U-S-E", they separated search results into 3 different categories (a decision that was made based on user feedback, I might add), so you go have to go though an additional step before you get to the search result. That is by no means "a pain in the ass". Why you'd need to access your mouse sensitivity settings so badly is beyond me. Here's another 2 other ways of reaching the control panel, both of which allows you to stay on the desktop that we all, um, love:

Posted Image


If anything, all this hoopla just speaks volumes about people's laziness and the extent they're willing to go to just blow something up out of proportion when it really isn't anywhere near bad at all.

Oh, and about the Mac App Store, Apple totally left Leopard users in the dirt by only supporting Snow Leopard. Did they need a new OS to implement a new app store? Nope. The Windows Store, however, runs on a new app platform (WinRT), so yes, it's something that older versions of Windows can't do. Metro-style apps (WinRT apps) are sandboxed, have much better security, and have better performance than Win32 apps. If Microsoft allowed Metro-style apps to run just like Win32 apps, it will only compromise all of these (unseen) benefits. That means we're going to continue getting UAC prompts galore (which some users have disabled although it's just a dialog box), file ownership issues, programs messing with the registry, startup programs slowing the PC down, and so on.

Edited by FalseAgent, 04 March 2012 - 08:28 PM.


#35 The Flashing Fish

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 09:11 PM

So it's a couple of more clicks to do certain things. It isn't a big deal, really (to be fair, it takes lesser clicks to do other things, like accessing in-app settings). You say your laptop hasn't been restarted in 2 weeks. I'll use the same analogy here: I haven't adjusted my mouse sensitivity since....forever. Yup.

Everyone just goes on about how they can't do this and that, bla bla bla, and yes, it's all true. I'm a Windows 7 user, a Windows 7 fan, and I know that as well. We all do.

We can go on nitpicking every single thing. There's no point to this: OSX users could nitpick at what they can't do on Windows, and hell, even XP users still continue to nitpick on Windows 7 because they think Windows XP is king.


Look, I almost always go with the latest and greatest, as long as it is better. If it's not better, why switch? I'm not "nitpicking." I'm pointing out common tasks that take longer to do.

You said you had Live Mail open at start up, but you haven't restarted your laptop in 2 weeks. So you had kept Live Mail running for 2 weeks just to get notified for new e-mails? Awesome! I had Live Mail open at start up once as well, and I know that Windows 8's implementation of Mail, while incomplete in it's current form, is already leaps ahead of what I used to do in Windows 7. Once again, this is just another pointless case of nitpicking.


I said I used to. I don't anymore. I use my phone for e-mail now, because it's easier and I can access it anywhere.

We must not confuse familiarity with ease of use. Just because Windows 7 and the taskbar+start menu is what we're familiar with, just because we know our way around it, doesn't mean that it's the best. We're just seasoned to it.


Oh, I'm not confusing the two. I'm more than willing to change, as long as it is easier to use. If it's not, what's the point of changing? Your next example exemplifies my point.

You want all of your programs? In the start screen > right click > all apps. Done. What's so difficult about that?


I never said it was difficult. It takes me longer to do it, and it isn't obvious. It's not easier to use. The start menu is there, it was obvious. You could have a list of all your programs up in 2 clicks. Now, if I'm in the classic desktop, it's now doubled. MS didn't make it easier.

As for searching for "M-O-U-S-E", they separated search results into 3 different categories (a decision that was made based on user feedback, I might add), so you go have to go though an additional step before you get to the search result. That is by no means "a pain in the ass".


In Windows 7, all I had to do was hit the windows key, type whatever control panel item I wanted and a list of common items would appear. Now, I type the item, I'm told no apps exist, and I have to manually go down to "settings." It takes me longer to do it and it is not as intuitive as it was in Windows 7 where I could type and it would show me the items immediately.



Why you'd need to access your mouse sensitivity settings so badly is beyond me. Here's another 2 other ways of reaching the control panel, both of which allows you to stay on the desktop that we all, um, love:

Posted Image


I had to access my mouse sensitivity settings so I could effectively use some of the gestures.

Thank you for showing me this. But it does go back to my point about the OS not being intuitive. If you have to go read a forum post or read a blog post to know how to do basic functionality, something is fundamentally wrong with the design of the UI.

For the "intuitive" way of opening the control panel from the charms menu, it still takes me longer to do than it did on Windows 7. Both are equally easy, but the charms way is more time consuming, so where is the advantage?

If anything, all this hoopla just speaks volumes about people's laziness and the extent they're willing to go to just blow something up out of proportion when it really isn't anywhere near bad at all.


The 2 UI 1 OS setup Windows 8 has just makes the entire OS feel clumsy and inconsistent. I'm constantly switching between look and feels, from a touch UI to a mouse/keyboard driven UI where touch features are tacked onto the mouse/keyboard driven classic desktop and mouse/keyboard features are tacked onto the touch driven UI. It is so much more complicated now.

Oh, and about the Mac App Store, Apple totally left Leopard users in the dirt by only supporting Snow Leopard. Did they need a new OS to implement a new app store? Nope. The Windows Store, however, runs on a new app platform (WinRT), so yes, it's something that older versions of Windows can't do. Metro-style apps (WinRT apps) are sandboxed, have much better security, and have better performance than Win32 apps. If Microsoft allowed Metro-style apps to run just like Win32 apps, it will only compromise all of these (unseen) benefits. That means we're going to continue getting UAC prompts galore (which some users have disabled although it's just a dialog box), file ownership issues, programs messing with the registry, startup programs slowing the PC down, and so on.


Apple left Leopard users behind because the OS was no longer supported and most of the apps no longer supported Leopard. And while the new Windows Store runs on a new app platform, it does host Win32 applications as well, something older versions of Windows can run. Windows 7 could just as easily have had an app store.

Edited by The Flashing Fish, 04 March 2012 - 09:15 PM.


#36 Frylock86

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 03:08 AM



You have some habits to break. Why are you torturing yourself by still trying to browse ALL your programs?

Windows Key > Type to search > Pin to Start. Hell, most programs are pinned to the Start Screen by default after installation.


Why should I break some habits? Why can't they give me more than one way to skin a cat. Guess what I can do in Windows 7? "Windows Key> Type to search> Pin to Start." Guess what I can't do in Windows 8? Easily access all of my programs. So really, all they have done is provide me with the same functionality in Windows 7 while making the same task that's easy to do in Windows 7 more difficult to do in Windows 8. THIS IS PROGRESS???

I don't need all of my programs pinned to the start menu, or on the taskbar. I simply don't. I don't need ATI's Catalyst Control Center pinned, I don't need WinRAR pinned. But every so often, I will need to access these programs, and you're expecting me to remember the name of them? Sure, if I do remember the name, I use search on Windows 7. If I don't, I have to find it, and on Windows 8, it's more of a pain in the ass. So what's better?

On Windows 8, it sure is torture searching through all of my programs. I can't say the same for Windows 7. MS really screwed the pooch on that.


That doesn't make sense. Why are you installing software of which you do not know A.) the name of the company or B.) the name of the software? I don't pin every little thing either, but I have yet to forget the name of any software I'm installing. Also, in Windows 8, Windows places shortcuts on both the desktop and Start Screen, just like it did in Windows' past by place them on the desktop and Start Menu.

In Windows 8, if you were to search for "AMD" bam, everything relating to "AMD" would appear. Same with WinRAR.

#37 The Flashing Fish

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 04:11 AM

That doesn't make sense. Why are you installing software of which you do not know A.) the name of the company or B.) the name of the software? I don't pin every little thing either, but I have yet to forget the name of any software I'm installing. Also, in Windows 8, Windows places shortcuts on both the desktop and Start Screen, just like it did in Windows' past by place them on the desktop and Start Menu.

In Windows 8, if you were to search for "AMD" bam, everything relating to "AMD" would appear. Same with WinRAR.


What doesn't make sense about it? I don't keep a comprehensive list of all programs on my computer, and I sure as hell don't memorize programs I seldom use, though I want to have.

And while the start screen pins installed programs to it immediately, if I seldom use it, it disappears off the screen.

In Windows 8, if you were to search for "AMD" bam, everything relating to "AMD" would appear. Same with WinRAR.


I can do this in Windows 7 too, except I get to stay in a consistent UI, instead of jumping back and forth between UIs. So where's the advantage? And what if I don't want to use my keyboard. I like keyboard shortcuts, but sometimes I'm too lazy to take my left hand and put it on the keyboard and remove my right hand from the mouse. So I'm glad that MS has now made the decision for me that if I want to open I program quickly I have to remove my hand from the mouse and use the keyboard, or I have to go through extra steps to do what I could once do in Windows 7.

So what's the advantage to me of having Metro replace the start menu, when the same functionality is there, but it's now more obfuscated. I really feel like MS introduced change just for the hell of it, with no added benefit to the end user.

#38 theapu

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 04:26 AM

There is no point in forcing the PC users to use a tablet or phone UI. Metro UI is only convenient for mobile devices. So there should be an option to disable it in PC version and give us back our start button.

#39 yanike

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 05:50 AM

I really like the mount feature for ISO. Good to see Windows becoming more friendly for advanced users.

#40 QuashPhillips

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 09:20 PM

Nearly a week now of having this OS on my lap. I really like it. Ive really come around on the new Start, offers me a whole next level of productivity. I noticed some complaints in this thread about metro apps missing certain functionality. Thats why it says "App Preview" at the top. Come on folks. CP is barely a beta, and yet people are trying to use it like a RTM. Thurrott has a great article on those "8 haters" Tis a great read

In Windows 7, all I had to do was hit the windows key, type whatever control panel item I wanted and a list of common items would appear. Now, I type the item, I'm told no apps exist, and I have to manually go down to "settings." It takes me longer to do it and it is not as intuitive as it was in Windows 7 where I could type and it would show me the items immediately.

Thank you for showing me this. But it does go back to my point about the OS not being intuitive. If you have to go read a forum post or read a blog post to know how to do basic functionality, something is fundamentally wrong with the design of the UI.

For the "intuitive" way of opening the control panel from the charms menu, it still takes me longer to do than it did on Windows 7. Both are equally easy, but the charms way is more time consuming, so where is the advantage?


Im sorry but I just had to reply to this. I fail to see how its less intuitive, to hover for the charms bar, see settings and see then control panel. Or even hover for the charms bar, see search, and get a list of your programs in addition to the search. You also say you cannot type mouse and get your mouse settings. Really? you expect an OS, barely even a beta to be fully functional as if it was RTM. COME ON

Edited by QuashPhillips, 06 March 2012 - 11:24 PM.


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