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Something Random I Discovered...


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#41 adrynalyne

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 09:29 PM

http://xpmath.com/ca...p...3&topicID=9

#42 endrit10

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 09:34 PM

Some of those there are bullshit.

Computer management?

WTF

#43 adrynalyne

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 09:41 PM

Here is an example.


http://www.helium.co...agorean-theorem




Another list of its uses.

http://answers.yahoo...09031819AAGS8XE

#44 henrydtv

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 09:44 PM

hey this is cool
but this topic should not be in "Genral Tech discussion"

#45 Afzal

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 01:52 AM

oh...it works...but i dont see any application to this formula (im talking about the new one "Discovered" at post #1)
btw...pythagoras is imo the most useful formula in math
all this differentiation n integration is what boggles me...how does anyone ever use that :S?

#46 adrynalyne

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 02:15 AM

Engineers use it. For example, differential equations are used to determine how much stress a bridge can take.


Integrals can be used to find area under a curve, for example, with probability and statistics.

Derivatives and integrals find their way into chemistry too.


I just finished up a project for class that involved using differential equations that are used to determine how much pressure to exert for a breathing machine.

Integration is used with proton NMRs as well, where you can determine how many hydrogen atoms are present at a certain chemical shift. Derivatives can be used to determine a rate of change of something, as well as velocity.

Edited by adrynalyne, 08 December 2008 - 02:21 AM.


#47 Syzygy

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 08:04 AM

Engineers use it. For example, differential equations are used to determine how much stress a bridge can take.


Integrals can be used to find area under a curve, for example, with probability and statistics.

Derivatives and integrals find their way into chemistry too.


I just finished up a project for class that involved using differential equations that are used to determine how much pressure to exert for a breathing machine.

Integration is used with proton NMRs as well, where you can determine how many hydrogen atoms are present at a certain chemical shift. Derivatives can be used to determine a rate of change of something, as well as velocity.


Maths will come in very handy for me...currently doing Maths B/C (In Australia, no idea what it'd be called in other countries) to get the qualifications for a Civil Engineer. Lotsamoooney :D

#48 coldemone

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 08:22 AM

I hate math, 90% of math we learn is useless in a real life environment.


onec it was, but when computers appeared, it got so applied.

#49 adrynalyne

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 11:22 AM


Engineers use it. For example, differential equations are used to determine how much stress a bridge can take.


Integrals can be used to find area under a curve, for example, with probability and statistics.

Derivatives and integrals find their way into chemistry too.


I just finished up a project for class that involved using differential equations that are used to determine how much pressure to exert for a breathing machine.

Integration is used with proton NMRs as well, where you can determine how many hydrogen atoms are present at a certain chemical shift. Derivatives can be used to determine a rate of change of something, as well as velocity.


Maths will come in very handy for me...currently doing Maths B/C (In Australia, no idea what it'd be called in other countries) to get the qualifications for a Civil Engineer. Lotsamoooney :D




Im majoring in chemical engineering here.

I hate math, 90% of math we learn is useless in a real life environment.


onec it was, but when computers appeared, it got so applied.



I'd say during and before Dark Ages, that was true.

#50 Afzal

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 12:42 PM

Engineers use it. For example, differential equations are used to determine how much stress a bridge can take.


Integrals can be used to find area under a curve, for example, with probability and statistics.

Derivatives and integrals find their way into chemistry too.


I just finished up a project for class that involved using differential equations that are used to determine how much pressure to exert for a breathing machine.

Integration is used with proton NMRs as well, where you can determine how many hydrogen atoms are present at a certain chemical shift. Derivatives can be used to determine a rate of change of something, as well as velocity.


hmm...didnt know that!! well...learning where everything i study is getting applied helps me take more interest in it :)

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